Details will be added as they become available.
Agenda subject to change.
Updated 10 November 2019

 

Monday, November 11

Advanced Phytoplankton Ecology

8:00 am – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Shelbourne Room | $215

  • Workshop Description

    This workshop explores the complex interactions that regulate the growth, distribution, and productivity of phytoplankton in lakes. With the increasing predominance of cyanobacteria in lakes around the world, understanding the concept of a lake as a home to these organisms is more critical than ever before. Examples from literature and case studies will be used to build the structure of the lake home starting with properties of water, (density, viscosity, redox, pH, light, oxygen and dissolved gases, and carbonate magic). Definition of properties will be followed by examination of the motions of water in lakes and how it is the master variable that regulates distribution of plankton (convection, turbulent flow, density gradients and stratification and water column stability). The aspects of water and motions are combined to provide a framework to review the different strategies that phytoplankton have adopted to remain in the water column (gravity, sinking, form resistance, density alteration, and vital sinking rates). The topics of growth rates and productivity will be covered briefly to provide context on how the phytoplankton community is forced to undergo seasonal succession due to changes in light, heat, nutrients, stratification, mixing and grazing. The workshop will conclude by describing how buoyance regulation allows cyanobacteria to take advantage of lake structure and dominate the plankton and develop surface blooms.

     

    Presenter

    George W. Knoecklein stated his limnological education at Unity College in Unity Maine, where he took part in one of the first studies of Unity Pond. George continued his education at Michigan State University where he earned a Master of Science in limnology while working on US EPA Clean Lakes projects at Lake Lansing, Michigan, and Skinner Lake, Indiana. After finishing his MS degree, George moved to the desolation of the Upper Peninsula of Michigan in January of 1982 where he was involved in quantifying impacts to St. Mary’s River ecosystem due to ice breaking winter shipping lanes. George moved back to Connecticut in 1985 to pursue a career in lake management. In 1997, George earned a PhD in limnology from Peter Rich at the University of Connecticut. That year he founded Northeast Aquatic Research, a consulting firm specializing in assisting lake stakeholders understand and manage the threats of invasive aquatic plants and cyanobacteria.

 

Aquatic Plant Identification for the Layperson

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | DoubleTree, Diamond Ballroom II | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    The SOLitude Lake Management Biology Team is pleased to present its Aquatic Plant Identification Workshop at NALMS in 2019. Content will be presented via several PowerPoint presentations, organized along major aquatic plant groupings, such as pondweeds, floating-leaf aquatic plants, bladderworts, and uncommon/rare aquatic plants. In between presentations, there will be ample time for the examination of live (previously frozen) specimens collected in the summer of 2019 throughout the Northeast. Bring a camera or a smartphone as these specimens will be suitable for photographing. We anticipate having at least 75 different submersed/emergent/floating aquatic plants (plus macroalgae) with an emphasis on invasive and nuisance native species on display. These live specimens will be supplemented with preserved and pressed aquatic plant samples as well. We will have handouts available to aid in identifications, as well as our library of taxonomic keys for use. Several specimens will be set aside unlabeled to practice your identification skills. And of course, the session will wrap up with a quiz of 15 curated unknown specimens. The entire SOLitude Biology Team will be on hand to assist with identifications, and to discuss aquatic plant survey techniques, floristic quality index, or aquatic plant survey output deliverables.

     

    Presenter

    Chris Doyle, CLM, has 25+ years’ experience as an aquatic biologist, with nearly 15 years’ experience in Freshwater Ecology. He has taught aquatic plant workshops at conferences for 10+ years, including the Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society (NEAPMS), The New York State Federation of Lake Associations (NYSFOLA), The New Jersey Coalition of Lake Associations (NJCOLA), and the New York State Sea Grant Program. He has conducted hundreds of days in the field surveying and conducting aquatic plant surveys throughout the Northeast. The rest of the SOLitude Biology Team have a combined nearly 20 years’ experience conducting aquatic plant surveys.

 

Aquatic Plant Identification

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Diamond Ballroom II | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    The SOLitude Lake Management Biology Team is pleased to present its Aquatic Plant Identification Workshop at NALMS in 2019. Content will be presented via several PowerPoint presentations, organized along major aquatic plant groupings, such as pondweeds, floating-leaf aquatic plants, bladderworts, and uncommon/rare aquatic plants. In between presentations, there will be ample time for the examination of live (previously frozen) specimens collected in the summer of 2019 throughout the Northeast. Bring a camera or a smartphone as these specimens will be suitable for photographing. We anticipate having at least 75 different submersed/emergent/floating aquatic plants (plus macroalgae) with an emphasis on invasive and nuisance native species on display. These live specimens will be supplemented with preserved and pressed aquatic plant samples as well. We will have handouts available to aid in identifications, as well as our library of taxonomic keys for use. Several specimens will be set aside unlabeled to practice your identification skills. And of course, the session will wrap up with a quiz of 15 curated unknown specimens. The entire SOLitude Biology Team will be on hand to assist with identifications, and to discuss aquatic plant survey techniques, floristic quality index, or aquatic plant survey output deliverables.

     

    Presenter

    Chris Doyle, CLM, has 25+ years’ experience as an aquatic biologist, with nearly 15 years’ experience in Freshwater Ecology. He has taught aquatic plant workshops at conferences for 10+ years, including the Northeast Aquatic Plant Management Society (NEAPMS), The New York State Federation of Lake Associations (NYSFOLA), The New Jersey Coalition of Lake Associations (NJCOLA), and the New York State Sea Grant Program. He has conducted hundreds of days in the field surveying and conducting aquatic plant surveys throughout the Northeast. The rest of the SOLitude Biology Team have a combined nearly 20 years’ experience conducting aquatic plant surveys.

 

Building Effective Watershed Based Plans – A Hands-On Workshop Using MassDEP’s Watershed Based Planning Tool

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | Davis Center, Chittenden Bank Room | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    A completed watershed-based plan is a requirement for all §319 nonpoint source grant applications. This half day workshop will introduce the watershed-based planning process, describe some specific applications relative to lake management (e.g., planning, goal setting, BMP selection, monitoring), provide tips for development of effective watershed based plans, and include an interactive exercise with MassDEP’s Watershed-Based Planning Tool for attendees to begin stepping through the process. Although this tool is specific to watersheds within Massachusetts, the material provided by this workshop will be broadly applicable to practitioners in all states and will be of particular interest to stakeholders, such as lake associations, interested in developing a watershed-based plan.

     

    Presenters

    Andrea Braga has over 14 years of professional experience focused on solutions to complex water quality, flooding, and regulatory compliance issues. She has extensive experience leading projects and specializes in stormwater management system design, modeling, and analysis. Her practice focuses on stormwater management using advanced green infrastructure (GI) and low impact development (LID) design technologies.

    Hayley O’Grady specializes in watershed-based planning, water quality data visualization and analysis, and hydraulic and hydrologic modeling. She is a key contributor to an array of projects including water quality studies, coastal resiliency outreach and vulnerability assessment, stormwater runoff modeling, and erosion control BMP assessment.

 

Intermediate R for Aquatic Research

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | Davis Center, Mildred Livak Ballroom | $115

  • Workshop Description

    This workshop will consist of two hands-on sessions with the goal of preparing users to work in R on their own. The morning session (8:00 am – 12:00 pm) will be an Introduction to R Workshop and will include introduction to the RStudio development environment, basic R syntax and programming conventions, variable types, object classes, data read/write, and working with packages in R. (e.g., how to read and write R code, understanding types of variables and their uses, and how to reference data for analyses from complex data sets), data management (e.g., how to manipulate, merge, sort, and subset datasets), descriptive statistics, and R packages (e.g., finding, loading, and understanding the supporting documentation).

    The afternoon session (1:00 – 5:00 pm) will be focused as an Intermediate R Workshop. Topics will include data manipulation and transformation, descriptive statistics, analysis tools, and plotting in base graphics and ggplot. more advanced data. Those less familiar with R should plan on attending both sessions, but those who have some experience using R could consider skipping the morning session and join during lunch for a half-day session. Laptop computers are required for both sessions. All software is freely available and can be installed prior to the workshop. Tutorials on software and packages to download will be provided a week before the start of the workshop. All software is freely available and can be installed prior to the workshop.

     

    Presenters

    Sarah Burnet is a PhD student at the University of Idaho and NALMS Student Director. Her research is focused on internal loading of phosphorus leading to algae blooms.

    Dan Stich is an Assistant professor at the SUNY Oneonta. His research focuses on development and application of quantitative tools for fisheries science and management, primarily through R.

    Lisa Borre is a Senior Research Specialist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and NALMS Region 3 Director. She is co-liaison for the NALMS Secchi Dip-In program, an active member in the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), and Lake Observer app project coordinator.

    Dana Stephens, PhD, has experience managing large databases, including North American Secchi data, and used various statistical analyses to examine temporal and spatial components of these data.

 

Internal Phosphorus Loading and Cyanobacteria

8:00 am – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Amphitheater | $215 FULL

  • Workshop Description

    Cyanobacteria (“bluegreen algae”) often proliferate at the same time and under similar conditions that are favourable for internal phosphorus (P) loading from lake bottom sediments. Internal loading as phosphorus (P) released from anoxic sediment surfaces often represents the main summer P load to lakes. Because of its high biological availability, the lack of dilution, and the timing, it can have an immense effect on summer water quality of a lake, reservoir, or pond.

    In this workshop correlations and coincidences, as well as limnological reasoning is provided in support of the hypothesis that cyanobacteria blooms (in general and for the recently increased frequency), are related to increases in internal P loading. While this workshop is based on my past Internal Load Workshop (2003–2018) much material has been added about the possible links between sediment released P and cyanobacteria blooms. To provide room, some of the more basic limnological and modelling sections have been shortened.

    Nonetheless, ways of quantifying internal load in polymictic and stratified lakes are still presented, sometimes in a stepwise fashion, where missing data may be predicted by subsidiary models. Applications regarding lake quality assessment and trophic state, and an introduction into the theory of lake restoration will be provided. Each workshop topic will include a description of the theory and presentation of case studies covering US, Canadian, and European lake assessment and restoration projects listed at http://www.fwr.ca.

     

    Presenter

    Gertrud K. Nürnberg, Ph.D. is an environmental scientist at Freshwater Research, a limnological company focusing on restoration and modeling of eutrophic lakes and reservoirs. She is specialized in internal processes in eutrophic lakes such as internal phosphorus loading and hypoxia and has more than 35 years of experience working with lake associations, governmental agencies, engineering companies and the private sector in the US, Canada, and Europe. She has published comparative research and empirical lake models on phosphorus, iron and anoxia and on lake management techniques in numerous scientific journals and was an associate editor of the NALMS journal, Lake and Reservoir Management.

 

Introduction to Phytoplankton Ecology and Taxonomy

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | Rubenstein Lab | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    This workshop will introduce you to the phytoplankton community found in lakes. Phytoplankton diversity and abundance is influenced by nutrients, water chemistry, environmental conditions and food web interactions. Over the millenia, phytoplankton have evolved many ways to beat out the competition for food and sunlight while also avoiding predators. We’ll introduce you to the beauty and complexity of the microscopic community that is hidden below the surface of your lake.

     

    Presenters

    Dr. Ana (Mindy) Morales-Williams is an Assistant Professor in the Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources at the University of Vermont. Her research focuses on cyanobacteria bloom dynamics in response to climate change processes. She has over a decade of experience in phytoplankton community ecology and taxonomy in lakes across the US Midwest, Northeast and southern Canada. She is co-founder of the Phycological Research Consortium, a collaborative network of phycologists that provides resources, training, and semi-annual workshops at Iowa Lakeside Laboratory.

    Angela Shambaugh is an aquatic biologist with the Lakes and Ponds Program in the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation. She has over 30 years of experience in phytoplankton taxonomy and lake management. Currently, she coordinates cyanobacteria monitoring and response for the Department and serves as co-chair of the NALMS Inland HABS program.

 

Introduction to R for Aquatic Research

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | Davis Center, Mildred Livak Ballroom | $115

  • Workshop Description

    This workshop will consist of two hands-on sessions with the goal of preparing users to work in R on their own. The morning session (8:00 am – 12:00 pm) will be an Introduction to R Workshop and will include introduction to the RStudio development environment, basic R syntax and programming conventions, variable types, object classes, data read/write, and working with packages in R. (e.g., how to read and write R code, understanding types of variables and their uses, and how to reference data for analyses from complex data sets), data management (e.g., how to manipulate, merge, sort, and subset datasets), descriptive statistics, and R packages (e.g., finding, loading, and understanding the supporting documentation).

    The afternoon session (1:00 – 5:00 pm) will be focused as an Intermediate R Workshop. Topics will include data manipulation and transformation, descriptive statistics, analysis tools, and plotting in base graphics and ggplot. more advanced data. Those less familiar with R should plan on attending both sessions, but those who have some experience using R could consider skipping the morning session and join during lunch for a half-day session. Laptop computers are required for both sessions. All software is freely available and can be installed prior to the workshop. Tutorials on software and packages to download will be provided a week before the start of the workshop. All software is freely available and can be installed prior to the workshop.

     

    Presenters

    Sarah Burnet is a PhD student at the University of Idaho and NALMS Student Director. Her research is focused on internal loading of phosphorus leading to algae blooms.

    Dan Stich is an Assistant professor at the SUNY Oneonta. His research focuses on development and application of quantitative tools for fisheries science and management, primarily through R.

    Lisa Borre is a Senior Research Specialist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and NALMS Region 3 Director. She is co-liaison for the NALMS Secchi Dip-In program, an active member in the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), and Lake Observer app project coordinator.

    Dana Stephens, PhD, has experience managing large databases, including North American Secchi data, and used various statistical analyses to examine temporal and spatial components of these data.

 

Lake Management Best Practices: Overview of Common Problems and Effective Management Strategies and Technologies

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | Davis Center, Williams Family Room | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    Those charged with managing, mitigating or restoring lakes are confronted with numerous products, services and promising technologies. Which are tried-and-true, and which are not ready for prime time? The presenters represent over a century of combined scientific, technical and practical experience managing common lake problems (excess or harmful algae, invasive plants and animals, nuisance weed growth – or some combination). Participants are encouraged to bring their lake management challenges for evaluation. Participants will be provided copies of Lake Management Best Practices – Managing Algae Problems from Lake Advocates Publishers.

     

    Presenters

    Harry Gibbons, PhD, has authored scientific articles, makes frequent presentations on lake management. For example, his first whole lake alum treatment was in 1974 and his first design of an integrated aquatic management plan in 1982, his first aeration and hypolimnetic aeration systems were designed in 1988. He has served on the NALMS Board three times and as Past-President. Dick Osgood, MS, has conducted hundreds of diagnostic/modeling evaluations, has authored numerous scientific articles, including design and implementation of alum treatments for lakes, and has prepared hundreds of lake management plans. He has served on the NALMS board as treasurer and as Past-President. Dana Stephens, PhD, experience in lake management spans publication of scientific articles, presentations, teaching students and community, hosting scientific and community-based workshops, and service such as positions on NALMS and FLMS board of directors.

 

Local to Global Partnerships for Research and Monitoring

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | Davis Center, Williams Family Room | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    This half-day workshop will be designed for a non-technical audience, including lake and watershed association staff and volunteers as well as research scientists and monitoring staff interested in partnering with local groups to establish volunteer monitoring or continuous monitoring and research capabilities. The workshop will be designed to share North American experience on the practical aspects of forming lake research and monitoring partnerships and installing and maintaining buoys and sensors. Jen Klug and her partners from Friends of the Lake (FOTL) will share their experience from Lake Lillinonah in Connecticut. FOTL has both high-tech (buoy) and low-tech monitoring programs (CLEO -more info here https://tinyurl.com/CLEOLillinonah). They will focus on issues that lake associations should consider when developing their own monitoring programs and share their perspective from a state without a state-sponsored volunteer water quality monitoring program for lakes. The workshop will also include June Fichter, Nicole Ward and others from Lake Sunapee Protective Association (LSPA) team in New Hampshire. They will share their experience of working in partnership with Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) researchers to install and maintain a research buoy and associated water quality monitoring program.

     

    Presenters

    Jen Klug is a limnologist at Fairfield University in Connecticut and a Global Lake Ecological Observatory (GLEON) member who works closely with a lake association (Friends of the Lake, FOTL) on monitoring Lake Lillinonah, the 2nd largest lake in Connecticut.

    June Fichter is Executive Director of the Lake Sunapee Protective Association (LSPA) and collaborates closely with researchers involved in the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON). Lake Sunapee is a GLEON research site. LSPA also has both high-tech (buoy and weather stations) and low tech monitoring programs (since 1985).

    Nicole Ward is working toward her PhD at the Global Change Center at Virginia Tech. Her PhD research is part of the larger multidisciplinary project, “Linking land-use decision making, water quality, and lake associations to understand human-natural feedbacks in lake catchments,” which is funded by the NSF Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems (CNH). The CNH-Lakes project brings together 6+ disciplines and 20+ researchers. As part of her research, she has been working closely with LSPA’s Director of Science Kathleen C. Weathers and LSPA partners at Lake Sunapee in New Hampshire.

 

The Role of Aeration/Oxygenation in Lake Management

8:00 am – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Willsboro Room | $215

  • Workshop Description

    Addition or air or oxygen is frequently used as a lake management option for lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. When used properly, aeration/oxygenation can increase oxygen concentrations in the water column, decrease sediment nutrient release, minimize iron and manganese concentrations, and prevent fish kills. These systems can be designed to provide complete mixing throughout the water column, to increase oxygen concentrations in the hypolimnion without mixing the lake, or to aerate surface waters and provide aesthetic appeal. Improperly designed or installed aeration systems can increase algal growth and lead to decreased water clarity. The workshop will discuss the pros and cons of aeration systems, describe factors that must be considered to properly design aeration/oxygenation systems, and present case studies for both successful and unsuccessful applications.

     

    Presenters

    Chris Holdren is a life member of NALMS with over 40 years of experience with lake and watershed management projects. Paul Wolff, Andy Sawyer, and Jon Knight are engineers with Reservoir Environmental Management, Inc., specializing in the development and application of river and reservoir models. Alex Horne, Emeritus Professor, University of California-Berkeley has worked on over 600 water-related projects throughout the world, many of which included additions of oxygen or air to meet various objectives. Kevin Bierlein is an engineer with Hydros Consulting and has spent nearly a decade working with various types of oxygenation and mixing systems.

 

Telling Your Lake Story With Maps: Narrative Story Maps

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | Davis Center, Jost Foundation Room | $115

  • Workshop Description

    The scientific, volunteer and lake management communities have historically invested significant time and money into collecting and analyzing data about lake characteristics. While graphs, charts, and traditional reports have their role in sharing information about your lake or watershed, stories are a more powerful way to engage a range of audiences and stakeholders. Several relatively new approaches to online mapping have dramatically expanded the ability of people to present information in a compelling online format for free (or nearly so) without any coding knowledge.

    This session will focus on helping participants to tell their stories through interactive, narrative-based Esri Story Maps, including the Map Journal, Map Series and Cascade templates, as well as, the newly-released next generation Story Map builder (for examples, see http://bit.ly/StoryMapTypes). Participants will learn the basics about how to create these Story Maps and will have the chance to either build a demo map using provided content or start building their maps with their own content.

    Notes: This is one of two sessions related to Esri Story Maps. No previous experience in GIS or Story Maps is required to attend this session. The content of either session can be understood without having attended the other. Also, the content in each session overlap very little with the other session.

     

    Presenter

    Shane Bradt leads the geospatial technology outreach program for Cooperative Extension at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). He is responsible for developing, coordinating and leading training opportunities on digital mapping topics, including desktop GIS, online mapping, storytelling with maps and mobile mapping. Shane coordinates the eXtension geospatial technologies community (MapASyst) group, leading efforts to promote the use of mapping throughout Extension nationally. Shane is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Geography at UNH. He specializes in lake water quality and issues related to cyanobacteria and is the co-lead of the NALMS Inland HABs Program.

 

Telling Your Lake Story With Maps: Photo-Based Story Maps

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | Davis Center, Jost Foundation Room | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    The scientific, volunteer and lake management communities have historically invested significant time and money into collecting and analyzing data about lake characteristics. While graphs, charts, and traditional reports have their role in sharing information about your lake or watershed, stories are a more powerful way to engage a range of audiences and stakeholders. Several relatively new approaches to online mapping have dramatically expanded the ability of people to present information in a compelling online format for free (or nearly so) without any coding knowledge.

    This session will focus on helping participants to tell their stories through interactive, photo-based Esri Story Maps, specifically the Map Tour and Shortlist templates (for examples, see http://bit.ly/StoryMapTypes). Participants will learn the basics about how to create both of these Story Maps and will have the chance to either build a demo map using provided content or start building their maps with their own photos.

    Notes: This is one of two sessions related to Esri Story Maps. No previous experience in GIS or Story Maps is required to attend this session. The content of either session can be understood without having attended the other. Also, the content in each session overlap very little with the other session.

     

    Presenter

    Shane Bradt leads the geospatial technology outreach program for Cooperative Extension at the University of New Hampshire (UNH). He is responsible for developing, coordinating and leading training opportunities on digital mapping topics, including desktop GIS, online mapping, storytelling with maps and mobile mapping. Shane coordinates the eXtension geospatial technologies community (MapASyst) group, leading efforts to promote the use of mapping throughout Extension nationally. Shane is a professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and Geography at UNH. He specializes in lake water quality and issues related to cyanobacteria and is the co-lead of the NALMS Inland HABs Program.

 

Understanding Harmful Algal Blooms

1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Diamond Ballroom I | $115
Also available as part of the Lake and Watershed Stewards Program

  • Workshop Description

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are becoming more common in lakes across the nation. While we still have many questions about what is driving these blooms and how to treat them, researchers and lake communities are working hard to better understand HABs. Join us as we provide an overview of what is known about HABs and why they are a concern. We will also discuss tools being developed to better forecast HABs, including early indicators of potentially harmful blooms. And we will share ways that you can get involved in tracking and investigating HABs in your favorite lakes through the Cyano Monitoring Collaborative (CMC).

     

    Presenter

    Dr. James Haney (Center for Freshwater Biology – Univ of NH and the CMC) has been working with students researching HABs in New Hampshire and beyond while preparing the next generation of researchers.

    Hilary Snook (USEPA and the CMC) is a senior environmental scientist with the US EPA and founder of the Cyano Monitoring Collaborative.

    Dr. Jennifer Graham (USGS New York Water Science Center) is a nationally recognized expert in cyanobacteria and associated toxins and taste-and-odor compounds. For almost two decades Jennifer has conducted research on the environmental factors influencing the occurrence of cyanotoxins in the United States.

 

Working With Sensors and Analyzing Sensor Data

8:00 am – 5:00 pm | Davis Center, Frank Livak Ballroom | $215

  • Workshop Description

    This will be a new workshop topic for NALMS and draw upon the vast knowledge and expertise of researchers and monitoring professionals working with automated sensors and analyzing, visualizing, and QAQC’ing continuous data in R, including rLakeAnalyzer, ContDataQC, and other tools. The advanced workshop will include a half-day of working with sensors, including configuring and deploying sensors and offloading data. Burnet will also share experience on deploying loggers in a reservoir, especially one that drops 10m on average every year. In addition to the presenters listed above, representatives of equipment manufacturers will be invited to present and answer questions. The afternoon will be used for advanced data analysis, visualization and QAQC tools and techniques. Presenters will cover advanced topics for those involved in EPA-supported Lake Regional Monitoring Networks (RMNs) in the Northeast and Midwest and the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON). The workshop will target a technical audience at an advanced level, including participants who are already working with sensors and/or monitoring and research networks or are interested in getting more involved.

     

    Presenters

    Kellie Merrell is an aquatic ecologist with the Vermont Lakes and Ponds Management and Protection Program. She has been monitoring Vermont’s inland lakes for compliance with the Clean Water Act since 2001. Prior to working on lakes she worked for EPA monitoring estuaries as part of the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment. She also worked in Environmental Consulting. She received her MS at University of Maryland’s Horn Point Laboratory studying the freshwater plant Vallisneria americana.

    Jen Stamp is an aquatic ecologist with Tetra Tech’s Center for Ecological Sciences, where she has worked since 2007. She works on a wide range of projects, including the Regional Monitoring Networks (RMNs), bioassessment, climate change, condition assessments in coastal and freshwater ecosystems, causal assessment/stressor identification, statistical analyses and GIS mapping. Prior to working at Tetra Tech, she worked for the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, Biomonitoring and Aquatic Studies Unit. She received her MS at Ohio University and her BA from Dartmouth College.

    Sarah Burnet is a PhD candidate at the University of Idaho and NALMS Student Director. Her research is focused on internal loading of phosphorus leading to algae blooms.

    Tim Martin is the Long-Term Monitoring Data Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR) Sentinel Lakes Program. He is responsible for planning, coordinating, directing, and implementing the management, sharing, and visualization of the data collected through this program as well as data analysis and assisting in field work and program management. Prior to working for the MNDNR, he was a GIS Project Manager. He received his MS in Water Resources Science at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities and his BS from Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama.

    Leslie J. Matthews, Ph.D., has worked in the Vermont DEC Watershed Management Division since 2005, most recently in the Lakes and Ponds Management and Protection Program. When not in the field monitoring lakes, she focuses on organizing and analyzing Vermont’s inland lake data and creating web-based tools for data access and visualization.

    Nicole Ward is a Ph.D. Candidate at Virginia Tech. She studies human-freshwater interactions and is particularly interested in the intersection of decision-making, land use, and water quality. Currently, Nicole’s research is focused on Lake Sunapee, where she has been working with the Lake Sunapee Protective Association (LSPA) to bridge ecosystem science and watershed management. Nicole earned a M.S. degree in Water Resources Science and Management at the University of Idaho, where her research focused on agricultural land management, hillslope hydrology, and farm policy.

    Kiyoko Yokota is a limnologist with a particular interest in phytoplankton population dynamics. She teaches undergraduate and graduate limnology, lake management, and other biology courses at State University of New York at Oneonta and volunteers for Otsego Lake Association. She graduated with a B.S. (biology w/ ecology emphasis) from Saint Cloud State University in Minnesota and qualified as an Associate Professional Engineer (As.P.E.Jp) while working for a civil engineering consultancy in Tokyo, Japan, on projects related to new dam construction proposals and management of existing reservoirs. Kiyoko earned a Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior from University of Minnesota and completed a short-term postdoctoral training at Netherland Institute for Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) before she started to teach full time.

 

Friday, November 15

Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds

8:00 am – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Willsboro Room | $215

  • Workshop Description

    Alum (aluminum sulfate) is widely used for controlling phosphorus (P) in lakes and ponds. There is a large body of knowledge and wide experience using alum due to its efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. This workshop provides a systematic overview of the planning, diagnostic, monitoring, dosing and application technologies for using alum for P control. Alum use strategies for deep and shallow lakes include a) water column P stripping, b) P interception, c) maintenance dosing, d) sediment P inactivation and e) P control in ponds. We provide overviews of the history of alum use, long-term efficacy, aluminum chemistry, diagnostic and modeling tools, a decision matrix for the appropriate alum use strategy, dosing calculations, application technologies and monitoring requirements. As well, we provide updated information on other P precipitants and compare/contrast costs, efficacy, reliability, etc. We will discuss numerous case studies and welcome participants to present their lakes’ concerns. The workshop is interactive and there is ample time for discussion. Workshop participants will receive a copy of Lake Management Best Practices – Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds by Lake Advocates.

     

    Presenters

    Harry Gibbons has authored scientific articles, makes frequent presentations on lake management and participated in his first whole lake alum treatment in 1974 and has been actively involved in over 265 alum applications. He has served on the NALMS Board and as Past-President.

    Dick Osgood has conducted hundreds of diagnostic/modeling evaluations has authored numerous scientific articles, including design and implementation of alum treatments for lakes. He has served on the NALMS board as treasurer and as Past-President.

    Shannon Brattebo is an environmental engineer. Shannon’s work has focused on lake and reservoir water quality, restoration, and management both in the Pacific Northwest and across the nation. Shannon has been a member of NALMS since 2001, is currently NALMS Region 10 Director and is a past board member of the Washington Lakes Protection Association.

    John Holz and Tadd Barrow are limnologists who own and operate HAB Aquatic Solutions, which specializes in conducting both small and large-scale alum applications. Both John and Tadd are longtime members of NALMS and John is a current director on the NALMS board.

    Joe Bischoff is a limnologist with Wenck Associates, Inc. whose work focuses on phosphorus cycling in deep and shallow lakes, reservoirs and ponds. Joe currently co-chairs the NALMS policy committee.

 

Collection, Identification, Ecology and Control of Freshwater Algae

8:00 am – 5:00 pm | DoubleTree, Valcour Room | $225 FULL

  • Workshop Description

    Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses and habitat are often impaired. Toxicity of algae has become a “hot button” issue, and other water quality implications and aesthetic considerations remain prominent issues. All algae were not created equal, however, and proper collection and identification are essential to selecting a management strategy. This workshop is intended to provide information on how to collect and recognize common genera within major groups of algae, with emphasis on taxonomic detail and identification approaches. Participants are encouraged to bring any algae samples with which they would like identification help. The workshop also covers basic algal ecology and the methods used to control algae, but with only 8 hours, we can only introduce participants to issues and options.

    The workshop is taught by Drs. Ken Wagner and Ann St. Amand, experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

     

    Presenters

    Ann St. Amand (co-chair) holds a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. She has 34 years of experience identifying and enumerating over 41,000 algal samples from all over North America. Her company uses a unique proprietary mounting method, and custom software containing information on nearly 34,000 different aquatic organisms.

    Ken Wagner (co-chair) holds a B.A. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He has taught an algal workshop in association with the North American Lake Management Society for 25 years, working cooperatively with expert phycologists and ecologists.

    Barry Rosen has a B.S. in Botany from the University of Connecticut, Storrs, an M.A. in Biology from St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, and a Ph.D. in Biology from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. He has worked in algae in freshwater ecosystems for the past 40 years. He has been affiliated with several universities, the private sector, state and currently the federal government and the University of Central Florida. He has lived in several states including Virginia, Nebraska, Florida, Oregon, Vermont, Michigan, North Carolina and now Florida, working on HABs nationwide.

    Andrew Chapman has been a phycologist with GreenWater Laboratories since its inception in 2001. He received a B.S. in Biology from Susquehanna University in 1990 and a M.S. in Botany from the University of Oklahoma in 1993. His masters research was on freshwater dinoflagellates. Since moving to Florida in 1993 he has been particularly interested in the ecology and taxonomy of potentially toxic cyanobacteria.

 

Stormwater Management for Lake Managers

8:00 am – 12:00 pm | DoubleTree, Shelbourne Room | $115

  • Workshop Description

    This workshop is designed for students, lake managers, lake community residents and applied limnologists interested in learning more about the management of stormwater management for lake communities.

    The objectives of the workshop are as follows:

    • Provide attendees with a basic introduction to the hydrologic and hydraulic principles of stormwater management.
    • Identify the role and fundamental importance of stormwater management as part of a long-term lake restoration plan.
    • Present and discuss the common green infrastructure stormwater management techniques that can be implemented in lake communities at both lot-specific (small) and community-wide (regional) scales.
    • Discuss the basic design and construction specifications and the maintenance requirements for the more commonly implemented green infrastructure stormwater management techniques used in lake communities.
    • Provide real world examples of the more commonly implemented green infrastructure stormwater management techniques.

    The overarching goal of the workshop is to demonstrate the importance of implementing ecologically appropriate, cost-effective green infrastructure stormwater management techniques as part of comprehensive lake restoration plan.

    Through this workshop attendees will:

    • Increase their understanding of how stormwater impacts lake ecosystems and the application of green infrastructure stormwater management techniques to lessen those impacts.
    • Be introduced to the hydrologic and applied ecology principles of green infrastructure stormwater management.
    • Gain an understanding of the application of hydrology, hydraulics and stormwater management in the long-term restoration of lake ecosystems.
    • Learn about the green infrastructure techniques used in urban and suburban settings to control and abate stormwater impacts, with emphasis placed on applications being utilized by lake managers, landscape architects, and water resource engineers throughout the country.

     

    Presenter

    Dr. Stephen J. Souza is the owner of Clean Waters Consulting, LLC. Steve is the founder of Princeton Hydro, LLC and served as the company’s president prior to his recent retirement in 2019. He has over 35 years of project experience managing and restoring lakes, ponds and reservoirs. Dr. Souza received his B.S. from the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth, his M.S. from Rutgers University, and his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut.

    Steve is a past president of the North American Lake Management Society (NALMS) and the Pennsylvania Lake Management Society (PALMS). He was the recipient of the NALMS Lake Management Success Story Award (2017) and the NYS Federation of Lake Association Lake Tear of the Clouds Award (2018).