Program subject to change.
Workshop fees are separate from conference registration.
Conference registration is not required to attend a workshop.
Workshops are offered in person only.
All times CST.

 

Workshops

Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Collection, Identification, Ecology, and Control of Freshwater Algae
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Development of HAB Management and Restoration Plans for Beaches and Marinas
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm | $115

Ecology of Cyanobacteria
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Identification and Ecology of Aquatic Plants
Monday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115

Internal Phosphorus Loading and Cyanobacteria
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Introduction and Intermediate R for Aquatic Research
Monday, November 14
Introduction to R: 8:00 am – 12:00 pm | $115
Intermediate R: 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115

The Role of Aeration/Oxygenation in Lake Management
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Sensor-based regional monitoring networks (RMNs)
Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Stormwater Management for Lake Managers
Monday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115


Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215
Sponsored by SOLitude Lake Management

Alum (aluminum sulfate) is widely used for controlling phosphorus (P) in lakes and ponds. There is a large body of knowledge and wide experience using alum due to its efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. This workshop provides a systematic overview of the planning, diagnostic, monitoring, dosing and application technologies for using alum for P control. Alum use strategies for deep and shallow lakes include a) water column P stripping, b) P interception, c) maintenance dosing, d) sediment P inactivation and e) P control in ponds. We will provide overviews of the history of alum use, long-term efficacy, aluminum chemistry, diagnostic and modeling tools, a decision matrix for the appropriate alum use strategy, dosing calculations, application technologies and monitoring requirements. We will discuss numerous case studies and welcome participants to present their lakes’ concerns. The workshop is interactive and there is ample time for discussion. Workshop participants will receive a copy of Lake Management Best Practices – Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds by Lake Advocates.

Presenters

Shannon Brattebo is an environmental engineer with Tetra Tech, Inc. Shannon’s work has focused on lake and reservoir water quality, restoration, and management both in the Pacific Northwest and across the nation. Shannon has been a member of NALMS since 2001, served as NALMS Region 10 Director and is a past board member of the Washington Lakes Protection Association.

Joe Bischoff is a limnologist with Barr Engineering, Inc. whose work focuses on phosphorus cycling in deep and shallow lakes, reservoirs and ponds. Joe currently is co-chair for the 2022 Symposium Host Committee.

Harry Gibbons has authored scientific articles, makes frequent presentations on lake management and participated in his first whole lake alum treatment in 1974 and has been actively involved in over 265 alum applications. He has served on the NALMS Board and as Past-President.

Dick Osgood has conducted hundreds of diagnostic/modeling evaluations has authored numerous scientific articles, including design and implementation of alum treatments for lakes. He has served on the NALMS board as treasurer and as Past-President.


Collection, Identification, Ecology, and Control of Freshwater Algae

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses and habitat are often impaired. Toxicity of algae has become a “hot button” issue, and other water quality implications and aesthetic considerations remain prominent issues. All algae were not created equal, however, and proper collection and identification are essential to selecting a management strategy. This workshop is intended to provide information on how to collect and recognize common genera within major groups of algae, with emphasis on taxonomic detail and identification approaches. Participants are encouraged to bring any algae samples with which they would like identification help. The workshop also covers basic algal ecology and the methods used to control algae, but with only 8 hours, we can only introduce participants to issues and options.

The workshop is taught by Drs. Ken Wagner, Ann St. Amand, Andy Chapman and Barry Rosen, all experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

Presenters

Ann St. Amand (co-chair) holds a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. She has 37 years of experience identifying and enumerating over 45,000 algal samples from all over North America. Her company uses a unique proprietary mounting method, and custom software containing information on nearly 34,000 different aquatic organisms. She is particularly interested in rapid assessment of recreational and drinking waters for human and environmental health.

Ken Wagner (co-chair) holds a B.A. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He has taught an algal workshop in association with the North American Lake Management Society for 25 years, working cooperatively with expert phycologists and ecologists.

Barry Rosen has a B.S. in Botany from University of Connecticut, Storrs, M.A. in Biology from St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, and Ph. D. in Biology from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. He has worked in algae in freshwater ecosystems for the past 40 years. He has been affiliated with several universities, the private sector, state and federal government and most recently Florida Gulf Coast University. He has lived in several states including Virginia, Nebraska, Florida, Oregon, Vermont, Michigan, North Carolina and now Florida, working on a HABs nationwide.

Andrew Chapman has been a phycologist with GreenWater Laboratories since its inception in 2001. Received B.S. in Biology from Susquehanna University in 1990 and a M.S. in Botany from the University of Oklahoma in 1993. Masters research was on freshwater dinoflagellates. Since moving to Florida in 1993 has been particularly interested in the ecology and taxonomy of potentially toxic cyanobacteria.


Development of HAB Management and Restoration Plans for Beaches and Marinas

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 12:00 pm | $115

A Lake and Watershed Implementation Plan is absolutely essential for the long-term management of a lake and its watershed. Such plans need to include both in-lake and watershed measures to address ecosystem-based issues for long-term and sustained improvements and protection. However, these large-scale, holistic, watershed-based plans frequently overlook the site-specific needs and concerns of those recreational facilities that involve primary and/or secondary contact. Such facilities include, but are not limited to, beaches, swim areas, marinas and dog parks. This workshop will review the water quality problems associated with these near-shore facilities, such as localized Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), invasive species, and pathogenic organisms such as E. coli. The workshop will also provide guidance on developing effective monitoring plans for these near-shore facilities. Additionally, the workshop will provide both in-lake, near-shore and local watershed solutions to preserve water quality and protect the health of people and pets at these recreational facilities. Finally, this information will be synthesized into a Beach or Park Restoration Plan, designed to complete the larger, Watershed Implementation Plan.

Presenters

Dr. Fred Lubnow is the Senior Technical Director at Princeton Hydro. He received his bachelor’s in biology from Susquehanna University, his Master’s in Environmental Sciences and his Ph.D. in Limnology both from U.C. Davis. He has been an environmental consultant for almost 30 years and has worked on a variety of ecosystems throughout the Mid-Atlantic States. He is an adjunct professor at Delaware Valley University and is a member of New Jersey’s HAB Expert Team.

Christopher Mikolajczyk, CLM, is a senior project manager and certified lake manager for Princeton Hydro and conducts the management, oversight, and coordination of aquatic ecology and water resource projects in three main areas: aquatic resource restoration and management, aquatic ecosystem sampling and investigations, and stormwater quality modeling and management. Chris is the current president of NALMS.


Ecology of Cyanobacteria

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

This workshop explores the complex interactions that regulate the growth, distribution, and productivity of cyanobacteria in lakes. With the increasing predominance of cyanobacteria blooms around the world, understanding the ecology of these organisms and their relationship to other phytoplankton is more important than ever before. This workshop dissects cyanobacteria blooms from the inside out. Beginning with the physiology of phytoplankton and how cyanobacteria stand out with specific physiological advantages (such as gas vacuoles) over the other plankton groups. The success both tactically and strategically of cyanobacteria to use advantages requires an understanding of the complex interaction between the phytoplankton and lake water. The workshop switches gears to discuss the unique properties of water that make lakes what they are and how the fate of heat and light are the pivotal structural aspects that regulate distribution and succession of all plankton. The final section of the workshop will organize the presented material into a concise set of conditions that lead to blooms, the different types of blooms that can form, how cyanobacteria blooms perpetuate themselves, and how global warming is making it certain that there will be more blooms, that will last longer in the future.

Presenters

George W. Knoecklein started his limnological education at Unity College in Unity Maine, where he took part in one of the first studies of Unity Pond. George continued his education at Michigan State University where he earned a Master of Science in limnology while working on US EPA Clean Lakes projects at Lake Lansing, Michigan, and Skinner Lake, Indiana.  George moved back to Connecticut in 1985 to pursue a career in lake management working for Ecosystem Consulting Service until earning a PhD in limnology from Peter Rich at the University of Connecticut. That year he founded Northeast Aquatic Research, a consulting firm that works specializing in assisting lake stakeholders understand and manage the threats of invasive aquatic plants and cyanobacteria.

Hillary Kenyon Garovoy is a Certified Lake Manager and Soil Scientist with Northeast Aquatic Research. She holds an undergraduate B.S. Environmental Science degree from the University of Connecticut and a M.S. Plant and Soil Science degree from the University of Massachusetts. She finds all topics in natural sciences fascinating, but Hillary’s favorite limnological subject is internal nutrient loading from subaqueous soils and sediments. When not out on lakes for water quality monitoring or aquatic plant surveying, Hillary is usually either hiking, diving, or gardening.


Identification and Ecology of Aquatic Plants

Monday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115

Aquatic plants are incredibly beneficial to the overall health of our lakes but are often incorrectly overlooked as ‘weeds’. This interactive workshop will provide background on basic aquatic plant ecology and introduce participants to the wide variety of aquatic plant species found throughout the Upper Midwest. The instructors will use a combination of short presentations and hands-on examination of live plants and pressed specimens. The workshop will focus on distinguishing plants with similar growth forms and among species in the larger genera. In addition to identification of native aquatic plants, a variety of non-native plant species at risk of invading waterbodies across the United States will also be covered. There will be a packet of printed materials including plant identification keys for each participant to keep.

Presenters

Michelle Nault is the statewide lakes and reservoir ecologist with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Water Quality. She has previously worked as a lakes research scientist and aquatic invasive species monitoring and response specialist for the Wisconsin DNR, with a focus on conducting research on aquatic plant ecology and invasive species management throughout the state.

Paul Skawinski works for the University of Wisconsin-Extension Lakes Program as the Statewide Coordinator of the Wisconsin Citizen Lake Monitoring Network. He also teaches Aquatic Plant Taxonomy at University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and is the author of Aquatic Plants of the Upper Midwest.


Internal Phosphorus Loading and Cyanobacteria

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Cyanobacteria (“bluegreen algae”) often proliferate at the same time and under similar conditions that are favourable for internal phosphorus (P) loading from lake bottom sediments. Internal loading as P released from anoxic sediment surfaces often represents the main summer P load to lakes. Because of its high biological availability, the lack of dilution, and the timing, it can have an immense effect on summer-fall water quality of a lake, reservoir, or pond.

In this workshop correlations and coincidences, as well as limnological reasoning is provided in support of the hypothesis that cyanobacteria blooms (in general and for the recently increased frequency), are related to increases in internal P loading. While this workshop is based on my past Internal Load Workshop (2003–2018) much material has been added about the possible links between sediment released P and cyanobacteria blooms. To provide room, some of the more basic limnological and modelling sections of the previous workshop have been shortened.

Nonetheless, ways of quantifying internal load in polymictic and stratified lakes are still presented, sometimes in a stepwise fashion, where missing data may be predicted by subsidiary models. Applications regarding lake quality assessment and trophic state, and an introduction into the theory of lake restoration will be provided. Each workshop topic will include a description of the theory and presentation of case studies covering US, Canadian, and European lake assessment and restoration projects listed at http://www.fwr.ca.

Presenter

Gertrud K. Nürnberg, Ph.D. (McGill, Quebec) is the principal of Freshwater Research, a limnological company focusing on restoration and modeling of eutrophic lakes and reservoirs. She is specialized in internal processes in eutrophic lakes such as internal phosphorus loading and hypoxia and has more than 35 years of experience working with lake associations, governmental agencies, engineering companies, and the private sector in the US, Canada, and Europe. She has published comparative research and empirical lake models on phosphorus, iron, and anoxia and on lake management techniques in numerous scientific journals and was an associate editor of the NALMS journal, Lake and Reservoir Management, where she is still actively involved in the peer-review process.


Introduction and Intermediate R for Aquatic Research

Monday, November 14
Introduction to R: 8:00 am – 12:00 pm | $115
Intermediate R: 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115

We are pleased to offer R workshop sessions this year on Monday, November 14. The morning session will be an introduction to R as a functional, vectorized, and object-oriented programming language. It will cover R syntax (e.g., how to read and write R code), types of variables and objects, functions, basic data management (e.g., loading, referencing, manipulation, transformation, and subsets), basic descriptive statistics, and working with R packages. The afternoon session will build on these techniques for an Intermediate R Workshop. Topics will include more advanced data management, an overview of common statistical tools in R, and plotting utilities. Those less familiar with R should plan on attending both sessions if interested in the Intermediate R workshop, but those who have some experience using R could consider skipping the morning session and joining for the afternoon session. Laptop computers are required for both sessions. All software is freely available and should be installed prior to the workshop.

Presenters

Sarah Burnet is a Biologist with the US Army Corps of Engineers in Portland, Oregon. She finished her PhD at the University of Idaho in 2022, is the co-chair of the Ethics committee, and former NALMS Student Director. Her research is focused on the internal loading of phosphorus leading to algal blooms.

Dan Stich is an Associate Professor in the Biology Department at SUNY Oneonta, where he teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in biometry, lake management, and ichthyology. He works extensively with R in research and teaching and maintains multiple R packages.


The Role of Aeration/Oxygenation in Lake Management

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Addition or air or oxygen is frequently used as a lake management option for lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. When used properly, aeration/oxygenation can increase oxygen concentrations in the water column, decrease sediment nutrient release, minimize iron and manganese concentrations, and prevent fish kills. These systems can be designed to provide complete mixing throughout the water column, to increase oxygen concentrations in the hypolimnion without mixing the lake, or to aerate surface waters and provide aesthetic appeal. Improperly designed or installed aeration systems can increase algal growth and lead to decreased water clarity. The workshop will discuss the pros and cons of aeration systems, describe factors that must be considered to properly design aeration/oxygenation systems, and present case studies for both successful and unsuccessful applications.

Presenters

Chris Holdren is a life member of NALMS with over 50 years of experience with lake and watershed management projects. Paul Wolff is an engineer with Reservoir Environmental Management, Inc., specializing in the development and application of river and reservoir models. Alex Horne, Emeritus Professor, University of California-Berkeley has worked on over 600 water-related projects throughout the world, many of which included additions of oxygen or air to meet various objectives. Kevin Bierlein is an engineer with Hydros Consulting and has spent nearly a decade working with various types of oxygenation and mixing systems.


Sensor-based regional monitoring networks (RMNs)

Monday, November 14, 8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

(This is a tentative description and will be revised) Are you interested in collecting high-frequency data from your lakes and reservoirs with sensors? Or do you currently do so and would like to learn how to effectively process and analyze the large amount of data that result from continuous monitoring by sensors? In this workshop researchers and monitoring professionals working with automated sensors and analyzing, visualizing, and QAQC’ing continuous data in R will share their experiences, tips, and data analysis tools. The workshop will target a technical audience at an advanced level, including participants who are already working with sensors and/or monitoring and research networks or are interested in getting more involved.

Presenters

(Tentative) Jen Stamp is an aquatic ecologist with Tetra Tech’s Center for Ecological Sciences. Tim Martin is the Long-Term Monitoring Data Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR) Sentinel Lakes Program. Nicole Ward is a Ph.D. Candidate at Virginia Tech. Kiyoko Yokota is an Associate Professor of Biology at State University of New York College at Oneonta.


Stormwater Management for Lake Managers

Monday, November 14, 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115

This workshop is designed for students, lake managers, lake community residents and applied limnologists interested in learning more about stormwater management.

The overarching goal of the workshop is to demonstrate the importance of implementing ecologically appropriate, cost-effective green infrastructure stormwater management techniques as part of comprehensive lake restoration plan. The workshop addresses each of the following:

  • Provide attendees with a basic introduction to the hydrologic and hydraulic principles of stormwater runoff and management to meet quantity, rate and quality control goals.
  • Examine some relatively easy to use, public domain models and tools that lake managers can use to compute runoff pollutant loads and runoff volumes.
  • Discuss the role and importance of stormwater management as part of a long-term lake restoration plan.
  • Present and discuss the common green infrastructure stormwater management techniques that can be implemented in lake communities at both lot-specific (small) and community-wide (regional) scales.
  • Present and discuss design and construction specifications, as well as the maintenance requirements, for the more commonly implemented green infrastructure stormwater management techniques used in lake communities.
  • Provide real world examples of the more commonly implemented green infrastructure stormwater management techniques.

Presenter

Dr. Stephen J. Souza, Owner of Clean Waters Consulting, has extensive expertise in the management and restoration of lake and reservoir ecosystems. His expertise includes watershed management, nutrient inactivation, aeration, dredging, invasive aquatic species control, and biomanipulation of fish and zooplankton communities. His experience in stormwater management includes BMP selection and sizing, permitting, cost analysis, and the preparation of maintenance plans. He is an Instructor for Rutgers OCPE and an Adjunct Professor at Temple University.