Agenda Subject to Change
Workshop fees are separate from conference registration. Conference registration is not required to attend a workshop.
Both NALMS members and non-members are invited to participate.
Workshops will not be recorded.
Updated 09 November 2021

In order to allow time for our workshop organizers to plan and get their attendees the materials they need, workshop registrations closed on Monday, November 8th. We appreciate your understanding!

Workshops

Algal Ecology, Control Methods and CyanoToxins
Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50

Algal Identification with Methods
Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50

Collecting and Analysing Water Quality Data With Sensors
Monday, November 15, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $25

Ecology of Cyanobacteria
Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET | $50

Get Your Communications as Crystal Clear as Your Lake!
Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET | $50

NALMS Transform Your Hidden Racial Bias Workshop
Session 1: Monday, November 15, 2:30 – 4:00 pm ET
Session 2: Friday, November 19, 12:00 – 1:30 pm ET
Session 3: Friday, November 19, 2:00 – 3:30 pm ET

Free to attend, but pre-registration is required.
Attendees are required to attend all three sessions.

Preparing for a Career in Lake Science/Management: Resumes, Cover Letters, and Interviews
Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET | Free, but pre-registration required

The Role of Aeration/Oxygenation in Lake Management
Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50

Stormwater Management for Lake Managers
Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50


Algal Ecology, Control Methods and CyanoToxins

Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses, and habitat are often impaired. Toxicity of algae has become a “hot button” issue, and other water quality implications and aesthetic considerations remain prominent issues. All algae were not created equal, however, and proper collection and identification are essential to selecting a management strategy. This workshop includes lectures on algal ecology, bloom formation, cyanotoxins and control methods. The workshop will include online materials for download.

The workshop is taught by Drs. Ken Wagner and Ann St. Amand, experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

Presenters

Ann St. Amand (co-chair) holds a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. She has 36 years of experience identifying and enumerating over 42,000 algal samples from all over North America. Her company uses a unique proprietary mounting method, and custom software containing information on nearly 34,000 different aquatic organisms.

Ken Wagner (co-chair) holds a B.A. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He has taught an algal workshop in association with the North American Lake Management Society for 30 years, working cooperatively with expert phycologists and ecologists.

Barry Rosen has a B.S. in Botany from University of Connecticut, Storrs, M.A. in Biology from St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, and Ph. D. in Biology from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. He has worked in algae in freshwater ecosystems for the past 40 years. He is currently a professor at Florida Gulf Coast University, working on HABs nationwide.

Andrew Chapman is a phycologist with GreenWater Laboratories since its inception in 2001. He received his B.S. in Biology from Susquehanna University in 1990 and a M.S. in Botany from the University of Oklahoma in 1993. His masters research was on freshwater dinoflagellates. Since moving to Florida in 1993 has been particularly interested in the ecology and taxonomy of potentially toxic cyanobacteria.


Algal Identification with Methods

Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses, and habitat are often impaired. Toxicity of algae has become a “hot button” issue, and other water quality implications and aesthetic considerations remain prominent issues. All algae were not created equal, however, and proper collection and identification are essential to selecting a management strategy. This workshop includes lectures on sampling and analysis methods, and identification of major groups including Cyanobacteria, Greens and Chrysophytes/Diatoms. Live microscope sessions will be included. The workshop will include online materials for download.

The workshop is taught by Drs. Ken Wagner and Ann St. Amand, experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

Presenters

Ann St. Amand (co-chair) holds a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. She has 36 years of experience identifying and enumerating over 42,000 algal samples from all over North America. Her company uses a unique proprietary mounting method, and custom software containing information on nearly 34,000 different aquatic organisms.

Ken Wagner (co-chair) holds a B.A. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He has taught an algal workshop in association with the North American Lake Management Society for 30 years, working cooperatively with expert phycologists and ecologists.

Barry Rosen has a B.S. in Botany from University of Connecticut, Storrs, M.A. in Biology from St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, and Ph. D. in Biology from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. He has worked in algae in freshwater ecosystems for the past 40 years. He is currently a professor at Florida Gulf Coast University, working on HABs nationwide.

Andrew Chapman is a phycologist with GreenWater Laboratories since its inception in 2001. He received his B.S. in Biology from Susquehanna University in 1990 and a M.S. in Botany from the University of Oklahoma in 1993. His masters research was on freshwater dinoflagellates. Since moving to Florida in 1993 has been particularly interested in the ecology and taxonomy of potentially toxic cyanobacteria.


Collecting and Analysing Water Quality Data With Sensors

Monday, November 15, 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $25 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

Are you interested in collecting high-frequency data from your lakes and reservoirs with sensors? Or do you currently do so and would like to learn how to effectively process and analyze the large amount of data that result from continuous monitoring by sensors? In this workshop researchers and monitoring professionals working with automated sensors and analyzing, visualizing, and QAQC’ing continuous data in R will share their experiences, tips, and data analysis tools. The workshop will target a technical audience at an advanced level, including participants who are already working with sensors and/or monitoring and research networks or are interested in getting more involved.

Presenters

Jen Stamp is an aquatic ecologist with Tetra Tech’s Center for Ecological Sciences, where she has worked since 2007. She works on a wide range of projects, including the Regional Monitoring Networks (RMNs), bioassessment, climate change, condition assessments in coastal and freshwater ecosystems, causal assessment/stressor identification, statistical analyses and GIS mapping. Prior to working at Tetra Tech, she worked for the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation, Biomonitoring and Aquatic Studies Unit. She received her MS at Ohio University and her BA from Dartmouth College.

Erik Leppo has worked for Tetra Tech for over 25 years. He analyzes data and provides technical support to clients in all aspects of data management, data quality management, GIS data processing and analysis, data analysis, taxonomic quality control, and field collection. Recent projects have involved using R programming and shiny apps on national conductivity, index calculation, causal assessment, continuous data QC, and USEPA’s Data Discovery Tool. He is experienced with taxonomic quality control comparisons, data QA/QC, developing reference condition benchmarks, data analysis, and tool development for biological condition gradient.

Kellie Merrell is an aquatic ecologist with the Vermont Lakes and Ponds Management and Protection Program. She has been monitoring Vermont’s inland lakes for compliance with the Clean Water Act since 2001. Prior to working on lakes she worked for EPA monitoring estuaries as part of the Mid-Atlantic Integrated Assessment. She also worked in Environmental Consulting. She received her MS at University of Maryland’s Horn Point Laboratory studying the freshwater plant Vallisneria americana.

Tim Martin is the Long-Term Monitoring Data Specialist for the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR) Sentinel Lakes Program. He is responsible for planning, coordinating, directing, and implementing the management, sharing, and visualization of the data collected through this program as well as data analysis and assisting in field work and program management. Prior to working for the MNDNR, he was a GIS Project Manager. He received his MS in Water Resources Science at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities and his BS from Samford University in Birmingham, Alabama.

Leslie J. Matthews, Ph.D., has worked in the Vermont DEC Watershed Management Division since 2005, most recently in the Lakes and Ponds Management and Protection Program. When not in the field monitoring lakes, she focuses on organizing and analyzing Vermont’s inland lake data and creating web-based tools for data access and visualization.

Nicole Ward is a Postdoctoral Fellow with Wisconsin Sea Grant and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. She is currently working on integrating climate resilience planning in Great Lakes coastal management projects within the WDNR Office of Great Waters. Nicole has expertise in human-freshwater interactions and the interaction of human decision making and ecosystem change. Nicole has worked with many different field sensors and associated analyses: from soil and agricultural sensors during her Master’s at the University of Idaho to lake monitoring buoys during her Ph.D. at Virginia Tech, where she primarily worked on Lake Sunapee in New Hampshire.

Kiyoko Yokota is a limnologist with a particular interest in phytoplankton population dynamics. She teaches undergraduate and graduate limnology, lake management, and other biology courses at State University of New York at Oneonta and volunteers for Otsego Lake Association. She graduated with a B.S. (biology w/ ecology emphasis) from Saint Cloud State University in Minnesota and qualified as an Associate Professional Engineer (As.P.E.Jp) while working for a civil engineering consultancy in Tokyo, Japan, on projects related to new dam construction proposals and management of existing reservoirs. Kiyoko earned a Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior from University of Minnesota and completed a short-term postdoctoral training at Netherland Institute for Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) before she started to teach full time.


Ecology of Cyanobacteria

Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET | $50 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

This workshop explores the complex interactions that regulate the growth, distribution, and productivity of cyanobacteria in lakes. With the increasing predominance of cyanobacteria blooms around the world, understanding the ecology of these organisms and their relationship to other phytoplankton is more important than ever before. This workshop dissects cyanobacteria blooms from the inside out. Beginning with the physiology of phytoplankton and how cyanobacteria stand out with specific physiological advantages (such as gas vacuoles) over the other plankton groups. The success both tactically and strategically of cyanobacteria to use advantages requires an understanding of the complex interaction between the phytoplankton and lake water. The workshop switches gears to discuss the unique properties of water that make lakes what they are and how the fate of heat and light are the pivotal structural aspects that regulate distribution and succession of all plankton. The final section of the workshop will organize the presented material into a concise set of conditions that lead to blooms, the different types of blooms that can form, how cyanobacteria blooms perpetuate themselves, and how global warming is making it certain that there will be more blooms, that will last longer in the future.

Presenters

George W. Knoecklein stated his limnological education at Unity College in Unity Maine, where he took part in one of the first studies of Unity Pond. George continued his education at Michigan State University where he earned a Master of Science in limnology while working on US EPA Clean Lakes projects at Lake Lansing, Michigan, and Skinner Lake, Indiana. George moved back to Connecticut in 1985 to pursue a career in lake management working for Ecosystem Consulting Service until earning a PhD in limnology from Peter Rich at the University of Connecticut. That year he founded Northeast Aquatic Research, a consulting firm that works specializing in assisting lake stakeholders understand and manage the threats of invasive aquatic plants and cyanobacteria.

Hillary Kenyon Garovoy is a Certified Lake Manager and Soil Scientist with Northeast Aquatic Research. She holds an undergraduate B.S. Environmental Science degree from the University of Connecticut and a M.S. Plant and Soil Science degree from the University of Massachusetts. She finds all topics in natural sciences fascinating, but Hillary’s favorite limnological subject is internal nutrient loading from subaqueous soils and sediments. When not out on lakes for water quality monitoring or aquatic plant surveying, Hillary is usually either hiking, diving, or gardening.


Get Your Communications as Crystal Clear as Your Lake!

Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET | $50 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

We have lots of things to communicate, but we sometimes lack the tools to communicate efficiently. This workshop will fill some gaps in science communication and will be in four parts.

First, we will break the ice with a brief part focusing on how to write short and efficient text on the form of a debriefing. The goal can either be presenting results or trying to get people involved in a lake-related project. Make sure your message does not end up like a drop in the ocean!

Second, you can lead a horse to the lake, but you cannot make him drink. Same with your audience. You cannot force them to listen, so make sure to be interesting! This part will focus on how to build an attractive, clear, and clean visual support, mostly through PowerPoint.

You feel like a fish out of water when you do a presentation? This third part is for you. It will give a tremendous number of tips to arrive calm, prepared, and sharp on the timing. Recognize your strengths and weaknesses and learn how to work with them.

Finally, satisfy your thirst for science communication with this fourth part that will unveil the creativity in you. We will discuss how to make a presentation out of the ordinary, and where are the opportunities to leave your watermark.

Arrive ready to interact and do not be shy, we are all in the same boat

Presenter

Lou Paris is from Quebec (Canada) and has a bachelor’s degree in biophysics and a master’s degree in water sciences, more specifically in ecotoxicology (the science of the contaminants in the environment). She is also a science communicator who gave more than 20 talks, led over 10 workshops, and participated in a dozen of science communication competitions. Until recently, she was the social media coordinator of the Canadian Water Network SYP committee. She is currently the event coordinator of Science SLAM Canada, the secretary of the Saint-Lawrence Chapter, and a full-time employee of the Yamaska watershed organization.


NALMS Transform Your Hidden Racial Bias Workshop

Session 1: Monday, November 15, 2:30 pm – 4:00 pm ET
Session 2: Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 1:30 pm ET
Session 3: Friday, November 19, 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm ET

Free to attend, but pre-registration is required. Registration closed November 8th.
Attendees are required to attend all three sessions.

Registration has closed

Science shows we all have implicit or unconscious biases, which is part of being human. Certain implicit biases, such as racial, gender or age do cause harm and perpetuate systems that oppress, exclude, and divide us. Divisions keep us from attracting and retaining top talent, drawing out the best in each other, creating and cultivating effective teams, organizations and a culture of inclusion and race equity. Unaddressed, it is like missing a leg on a stool that we need to stand on to succeed and be effective in our work. As leaders we have a responsibility to learn how to improve our knowledge, skills, and competencies to increase our collective impact and better support our colleagues, organizations, and constituents. The path to systems and a culture that are predominantly inclusive and equitable is an iterative journey from unaware to advocate. Every system and organization is made up of individuals so this course focuses on the individual and compliments any organizational training. There is no one way to travel on the path. This course provides information, actions, a process, and resources combined with your intention, attention and commitment reduce the impact of implicit bias.

This course is for you if you:

  • Are aware you have a role and are educating yourself how to move forward
  • Want to do no harm
  • Want to liberate yourself
  • Don’t know what to do or where to start
  • Are afraid to say or do the wrong thing
  • Want to build the skill set to take meaningful action
  • Want to be an Aly and build powerful partnerships

Outcomes

  • Learn Three Technologies to utilize in this work
  • Define “implicit racial bias”, how it works and provide examples
  • 5 tangible steps you can take to Stop implicit racial bias
  • Personal action plan
  • Resources, support, and next steps

Workshop Requirements:

  • Pre-Registration is required. A pre-package will be sent to participants that includes preparation, more details, and resources.
  • Full attendance to all three sessions. Two 90-minute sessions with a 30-minute break on Wednesday afternoon and one final 90-minute session on Thursday after lunch. The course is progressive with action to be taken in between sessions.

Content for the course has been curated from many sources and include How to be an Inclusive Leader, Jennifer Brown, Courses from Racial Justice from the Heart, Dr. Amanda Kemp, So You Want To Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo and White Fragility, Robin Diangelo. Content adapts the “5 Steps to Stop Implicit Racial Bias” from Dr. Amanda Kemp for this venue and audience and is a mix of assessment tools, videos, direct teaching, facilitated break out groups and a small amount of homework.

Presenters

Kristen Mun was born and raised on the island of Oahu. She currently lives in Portland, Oregon where she works as a cultural consultant, racial justice facilitator, and a core member of the Accountability Collective, a group of volunteers working toward racial equality for the Portland theatre community. When she is not a facilitator and project manager with Racial Justice from the HEART she is a stage manager and fight choreographer in the Portland theatre community.

Barb Horn was born and raised in Colorado and currently resides in the southwest corner near Durango. She has 33 years’ experience in water quality monitoring and policy, data management and with community scientists, working locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally. She is trained in facilitation and community mediation and as a Racial Justice From the Heart Facilitator, Master Presenter and a Roger Love Method Voice Coach. She claims she achieved her peak at five years old and has been trying to get it back ever since.


Preparing for a Career in Lake Science/Management: Resumes, Cover Letters, and Interviews

Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 3:00 pm ET | Free, but pre-registration required | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

This workshop is intended for students and early career professionals seeking guidance to become successful job candidates. The workshop will be divided into two segments. In the first segment, participants will receive an overview on the do’s and don’ts for writing effective resumes and cover letters and will be paired with mentors who have experience hiring in academia, private and public sectors. In the second segment, participants will receive tips and tricks for successful interviews and will be paired with mentors to practice interviewing for a posted job. Mentors will work one-on-one with mentees to improve their resumes, cover letters and interviewing skills.

Presenters

Student Programs Working Group, members of the working group include graduate students and professors in academia, and professionals in both private and public sectors.


The Role of Aeration/Oxygenation in Lake Management

Monday, November 15, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

Addition or air or oxygen is frequently used as a lake management option for lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. When used properly, aeration/oxygenation can increase oxygen concentrations in the water column, decrease sediment nutrient release, minimize iron and manganese concentrations, and prevent fish kills. These systems can be designed to provide complete mixing throughout the water column, to increase oxygen concentrations in the hypolimnion without mixing the lake, or to aerate surface waters and provide aesthetic appeal. Improperly designed or installed aeration systems can increase algal growth and lead to decreased water clarity. The workshop will discuss the pros and cons of aeration systems, describe factors that must be considered to properly design aeration/oxygenation systems, and present case studies for both successful and unsuccessful applications.

Presenters

Chris Holdren has over 45 years of experience with lake and watershed management projects. Alex Horne, Emeritus Professor, University of California-Berkeley has worked on over 600 water-related projects throughout the world, many of which included additions of oxygen or air to meet various objectives. Kevin Bierlein is an engineer with Hydros Consulting and has spent nearly a decade working with various types of oxygenation and mixing systems.


Stormwater Management for Lake Managers

Friday, November 19, 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm ET | $50 | Registration closed November 8th

Registration has closed

This workshop is designed for students, lake managers, lake community residents and applied limnologists interested in learning more about the management of stormwater management for lake communities.

The objectives of the workshop are as follows:

  • Provide attendees with a basic introduction to the hydrologic and hydraulic principles of stormwater management.
  • Identify the role and fundamental importance of stormwater management as part of a long-term lake restoration plan.
  • Present and discuss the common green infrastructure stormwater management techniques that can be implemented in lake communities at both lot-specific (small) and community-wide (regional) scales.
  • Discuss the basic design and construction specifications and the maintenance requirements for the more commonly implemented green infrastructure stormwater management techniques used in lake communities.
  • Provide real world examples of the more commonly implemented green infrastructure stormwater management techniques.

The overarching goal of the workshop is to demonstrate the importance of implementing ecologically appropriate, cost-effective green infrastructure stormwater management techniques as part of comprehensive lake restoration plan

Presenter

Dr. Stephen J. Souza is the Owner of Clean Waters Consulting, LLC. He is also the Founding Partner of Princeton Hydro, LLC. From its inception in 1998 through 2018, he served as President of Princeton Hydro, retiring from the company in 2019. Over the past 35 years he has dedicated his career to the management and restoration of aquatic ecosystems, in particular lakes, ponds, and reservoirs. Dr. Souza is a past president of NALMS and PALMS. Dr. Souza’s achievements include the NALMS Lake Management Success Story Award (2017), and the NYS Federation of Lake Association Lake Tear of the Clouds Award (2018).