Agenda subject to change.
All workshops will be held on Tuesday, October 30

 

Alum for Phosphorus Control in Lakes and Ponds

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215
Sponsored by HAB Aquatic Solutions

Alum (aluminum sulfate) is widely used for controlling phosphorus (P) in lakes and ponds. There is a large body of knowledge and wide experience using alum due to its efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness. This workshop provides a systematic overview of the planning, diagnostic, monitoring, dosing and application technologies for using alum for P control. Alum use strategies for deep and shallow lakes include a) water column P stripping, b) P interception, c) maintenance dosing, d) sediment P inactivation and e) P control in ponds. We provide overviews of the history of alum use, long-term efficacy, aluminum chemistry, diagnostic and modeling tools, a decision matrix for the appropriate alum use strategy, dosing calculations, application technologies and monitoring requirements. As well, we provide updated information on other P precipitants and compare/contrast costs, efficacy, reliability, etc. We will discuss numerous case studies and welcome participants to present their lakes’ concerns. The workshop is interactive and there is ample time for discussion.

Presenters

Harry Gibbons has authored scientific articles, makes frequent presentations on lake management and participated in his first whole lake alum treatment in 1974 and has been actively involved in over 265 alum applications. He has served on the NALMS Board and as Past-President. Dick Osgood has conducted hundreds of diagnostic/modeling evaluations has authored numerous scientific articles, including design and implementation of alum treatments for lakes. He has served on the NALMS board as treasurer and as Past-President. Shannon Brattebo is an environmental engineer. Shannon’s work has focused on lake and reservoir water quality, restoration, and management both in the Pacific Northwest and across the nation. Shannon has been a member of NALMS since 2001, is currently NALMS Region 10 Director and is a past board member of the Washington Lakes Protection Association. John Holz and Tadd Barrow are limnologists who own and operate HAB Aquatic Solutions, which specializes in conducting both small and large-scale alum applications. Both John and Tadd are longtime members of NALMS and John is a current director on the NALMS board. Joe Bischoff is a limnologist with Wenck Associates, Inc. whose work focuses on phosphorus cycling in deep and shallow lakes, reservoirs and ponds. Joe currently co-chairs the NALMS policy committee.


An Introduction to the Hydrologic Principles and the Application of Green Infrastructure Stormwater Management Techniques for Lake Communities

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Stormwater is typically the major source of nutrient loading responsible for the eutrophication of lakes, ponds and reservoirs. Reducing nutrient loading via stromwater management is typically an intrinsic element of most lake restoration plans. However, there tends to be a lack of understanding of how to properly address the problems caused by stormwater runoff and more importantly how to go about properly selecting and implementing stormwater management techniques.

Green infrastructure stormwater best management practices (BMPs) are widely promoted by state and federal agencies as the proper way to control, treat and reduce stormwater runoff and its associated problems. These techniques are especially well suited for implementation in lake communities.

This course focuses on the proper design and application of various green infrastructure BMPs. The course begins with a basic introduction to stormwater hydrology and leads into the selection and application of commonly implemented green infrastructure techniques; ranging from BMPs suitable for use on an individual lot to techniques used to manage runoff on a community scale. Examples are provided of actual green infrastructure stormwater BMPs constructed in different lake community settings.

Presenter

Dr. Stephen Souza oversees, directs, and coordinates all of the aquatic ecology and water resource projects conducted by Princeton Hydro. His academic training and professional experience encompass three primary areas of expertise: aquatic resource restoration and management, aquatic ecosystem sampling and investigations, and stormwater quality modeling and management.

He has utilized his expertise in the management of stormwater to obtain grant monies from State and Federal funding agencies that were in turn used in the design and construction of stormwater quality BMPs and the retrofit and upgrade of existing stormwater management structures. A number of these projects have received awards from State and Federal agencies, the North American Lake Management Society, and the American Society of Landscape Architects.


Freshwater Algal Ecology, Methodology and Control – Lecture Only

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 12:00 pm | $115
Sponsored by PhycoTech, Inc.

Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses and habitat are often impaired. Toxicity of algae has become a “hot button” issue, and other water quality implications and aesthetic considerations remain prominent issues. All algae were not created equal, however, and proper collection and identification are essential to selecting a management strategy. This workshop is intended to provide lecture information on basic algal ecology, the methods used to collect and control algae, algal toxins and how to recognize macroscopic blooms of basic algal divisions. The workshop is taught by Drs. Ken Wagner and Ann St. Amand, experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

Presenters

Ann St. Amand (co-chair) holds a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. She has 32 years of experience identifying and enumerating over 41,000 algal samples from all over North America. Her company uses a unique proprietary mounting method, and custom software containing information on nearly 34,000 different aquatic organisms.

Ken Wagner (co-chair) holds a B.A. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He has taught an algal workshop in association with the North American Lake Management Society for 26 years, working cooperatively with expert phycologists and ecologists.

Barry Rosen has a B.S. in Botany from University of Connecticut, Storrs, M.A. in Biology from St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, and Ph. D. in Biology from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. He has worked in algae in freshwater ecosystems for the past 40 years. He has been affiliated with several universities, the private sector, state and currently the federal government and the University of Central Florida. He has have lived in several states including Virginia, Nebraska, Florida, Oregon, Vermont, Michigan, North Carolina and now Florida, working on a HABs nationwide.

Andrew Chapman has been a phycologist with GreenWater Laboratories since its inception in 2001. He received his B.S. in Biology from Susquehanna University in 1990 and a M.S. in Botany from the University of Oklahoma in 1993. His masters research was on freshwater dinoflagellates. Since moving to Florida in 1993, he has been particularly interested in the ecology and taxonomy of potentially toxic cyanobacteria.


Freshwater Algal Identification – Microscope Based

Tuesday, October 30
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $125
Sponsored by PhycoTech, Inc.

Photo by Ken Wagner

Algae are an important part of a properly functioning natural aquatic system, but when algae become abundant, water uses and habitat are often impaired. Toxicity of algae has become a “hot button” issue, and other water quality implications and aesthetic considerations remain prominent issues. All algae were not created equal, however, and proper identification is essential to selecting a management strategy. This workshop is intended to provide lecture/laboratory experience on how to recognize common genera within major groups of algae, with emphasis on taxonomic detail and identification approaches. Participants are encouraged to bring any algae samples with which they would like identification help. The workshop is taught by Drs. Ken Wagner and Ann St. Amand, experienced algal taxonomists and ecologists working in applied fields. Collectively they have many years of experience assessing algal problems, evaluating impacts and causes of algal nuisances, and developing algal management programs.

Presenters

Ann St. Amand (co-chair) holds a Ph.D. in Aquatic Ecology from the University of Notre Dame. She has 32 years of experience identifying and enumerating over 41,000 algal samples from all over North America. Her company uses a unique proprietary mounting method, and custom software containing information on nearly 34,000 different aquatic organisms.

Ken Wagner (co-chair) holds a B.A. in Environmental Biology from Dartmouth College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Natural Resource Management from Cornell University. He has taught an algal workshop in association with the North American Lake Management Society for 26 years, working cooperatively with expert phycologists and ecologists.

Barry Rosen has a B.S. in Botany from University of Connecticut, Storrs, M.A. in Biology from St. Cloud State University, Minnesota, and Ph. D. in Biology from Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio. He has worked in algae in freshwater ecosystems for the past 40 years. He has been affiliated with several universities, the private sector, state and currently the federal government and the University of Central Florida. He has have lived in several states including Virginia, Nebraska, Florida, Oregon, Vermont, Michigan, North Carolina and now Florida, working on a HABs nationwide.

Andrew Chapman has been a phycologist with GreenWater Laboratories since its inception in 2001. He received his B.S. in Biology from Susquehanna University in 1990 and a M.S. in Botany from the University of Oklahoma in 1993. His masters research was on freshwater dinoflagellates. Since moving to Florida in 1993, he has been particularly interested in the ecology and taxonomy of potentially toxic cyanobacteria.


Internal Phosphorus Loading

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Photo by Chris Mikolajczyk

Internal phosphorus loading as phosphorus (P) released from anoxic sediment surfaces often represents the main summer P load to lakes. Because of its high biological availability, the lack of dilution, and the timing, it can have an immense effect on summer water quality of a lake, reservoir, or pond. However, depending on the stratification of the lake, it is not always easy to determine the quantity of internal load (especially in polymictic lakes), and it may be difficult to estimate the ultimate effect it may have on surface water quality (especially in stratified lakes).

This workshop presents a way of quantifying internal load in polymictic as well as stratified lakes. Considering lake characteristics and data availability, such quantification can be done in a step-wise fashion, where missing data may be predicted by subsidiary models. After the mere quantification of internal load, the participant will learn how to combine it with external load in a simple mass balance model to predict seasonal phosphorus concentration. Knowing this, other water quality characteristics (algal biomass, bloom frequencies, Secchi disk transparency, and hypolimnetic anoxia) can be arrived at. Applications regarding lake quality assessment, nutrient criteria, total maximum daily load (TMDL) computations, and restoration options will be discussed.

Each workshop topic will include a description of the theory and presentation of case studies covering US, Canadian, and European lake assessment and restoration projects. Open discussion with attendees is encouraged, and comprehensive handouts and references will be provided. For preparation, see publications listed at www.fwr.ca, especially Nürnberg GK. 2009: Assessing internal phosphorus load – problems to be solved. Lake Reservoir Management 25:419–432.

Presenter

Gertrud K. Nürnberg, Ph.D. is an environmental scientist at Freshwater Research, a limnological company focusing on restoration and modeling of eutrophic lakes and reservoirs. She is specialized in internal processes in eutrophic lakes such as internal phosphorus loading and hypoxia and has 35 years of experience working with lake associations, governmental agencies, engineering companies and the private sector in the US, Canada, and Europe. She has published comparative research and empirical lake models on phosphorus, iron and anoxia and on lake management techniques in numerous scientific journals and was an associate editor of the NALMS journal, Lake and Reservoir Management.


Introduction to R for Aquatic Research

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

This workshop will consist of two sessions. The morning session will be an Introduction to R workshop and will include the following topics: R syntax (e.g., how to read and write R code, understanding types of variables and their uses, and how to reference data for analyses from complex data sets), data management (e.g., how to manipulate, merge, sort, and subset datasets), basic descriptive statistics, and R packages (e.g., finding, loading, and understanding the supporting documentation). The afternoon session will utilize the Secchi Dip-In data set for an Intermediate R Workshop. Topics will include: regression analysis, latitude/longitude mapping, time series analysis, simulations and looping functions. Those less familiar with R should plan on attending both sessions, but those who have some experience using R could consider skipping the morning session and join during lunch for a half-day session. Laptop computers are required for both sessions. All software is freely available and can be installed prior to the workshop.

Presenters

Sarah Burnet is a PhD student at the University of Idaho and NALMS Student Director. Her research is focused on internal loading of phosphorus leading to algae blooms.

Dan Stich is an Assistant professor at the SUNY Oneonta. His research focuses on development and application of quantitative tools for fisheries science and management, primarily through R.

Lisa Borre is a Senior Research Specialist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and NALMS Region 3 Director. She is co-liaison for the NALMS Secchi Dip-In program, an active member in the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), and Lake Observer app project coordinator.

Dana Stephens, PhD, has experience managing large databases, including North American Secchi data, and used various statistical analyses to examine temporal and spatial components of these data.


Introduction to Sampling and Identification of Freshwater Fish Eggs and Larvae

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

This workshop is intended to provide an introduction to sampling and identification of freshwater fish early life history stages, with an emphasis on Great Lakes and Midwestern fauna. The workshop will include a discussion of sample processing protocols, larval fish morphological features useful for identification, and a procedure for using dichotomous keys to identify specimens. Examples of sampling gear and laboratory equipment will be demonstrated. This workshop will make use of digital images of fish eggs and larvae to introduce participants to morphological and meristic characters used in larval fish identification.

Presenters

Ed Roseman is a research biologist for the USGS Great Lakes Science Center where he conducts research on Great Lakes fishes and their habitats with an emphasis on restoration of spawning and nursery habitats.

Stacey Ireland is a fishery technician for the USGS Great Lakes Science Center where she assists with research on early life stages of Great Lakes fishes and their habitats.

Amy George is a fish biologist for the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center where she specializes in research on early life history of riverine fishes, with an emphasis on Asian carps.


Lake Management Best Practices: Overview of Common Problems and Effective Management Strategies and Technologies

Tuesday, October 30
1:00 pm – 5:00 pm | $115

Those charged with managing, mitigating or restoring lakes are confronted with numerous products, services and promising technologies. Which are tried-and-true, and which are not ready for prime time? The presenters represent over a century of combined scientific, technical and practical experience managing common lake problems (excess or harmful algae, invasive plants and animals, nuisance weed growth – or some combination). Participants are encouraged to bring their lake management challenges for evaluation. Participants will be provided copies of Lake Management Best Practices – Managing Algae Problems from Lake Advocates Publishers.

Presenters

Harry Gibbons, PhD, has authored scientific articles, makes frequent presentations on lake management. For examples, his first whole lake alum treatment was in 1974 and his first design of an integrated aquatic management plan in 1982, his first aeration and hypolimnetic aeration systems were designed in 1988. He has served on the NALMS Board three times and as Past-President. Dick Osgood, MS, has conducted hundreds of diagnostic/modeling evaluations, has authored numerous scientific articles, including design and implementation of alum treatments for lakes, and has prepared hundreds of lake management plans. He has served on the NALMS board as treasurer and as Past-President. Dana Stephens, PhD, experience in lake management spans publication of scientific articles, presentations, teaching students and community, hosting scientific and community-based workshops, and service such as positions on NALMS and FLMS board of directors. Toni Pennington, PhD, experienced in the research and management of aquatic plants across the western US and the development of aquatic invasive species (AIS) management plans across multiple local, state, and federal agencies. Toni is an active board member for the Oregon Lakes Association and the Western Aquatic Plant Management Society. Rob Plotnikoff, MS, was the water quality monitoring lead for Washington State Department of Ecology for 17 years. Lead AIS for invertebrates, toxic pathways determination for aquatic toxins, and the lead water quality data manager as a consultant for 10 years, He is now the AIS head for Snohomish County Public Works, Washington.


Lanthanum modified bentonite – dosing, ecotoxicology and modelling

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $100
Sponsored by Phoslock Water Solutions

Lanthanum modified bentonite (LMB, commercially known as Phoslock) is being increasingly used to immobilize phosphate in eutrophied lakes and reservoirs, thereby mitigating against the risk of cyanobacterial blooms. It is a highly efficient phosphate binder due to the strong affinity of lanthanum (La) for oxyanions such as phosphate. This workshop will provide participants with a brief introduction to Phoslock, explaining what it is, how it is being used and what its strengths and weaknesses are. Tutorials relating to dosage calculations and ecotoxicology will be conducted, followed by an explanation of chemical equilibrium modelling (Cheaqs Next). Participants will be given the opportunity to run their own modelling scenarios using free available software which can be provided and installed in advance.

Presenters

Dr Miquel Lurling is an Associate Professor at Wageningen University (The Netherlands), and co-chairman of the Working Group on Lake Restoration of the International Society of Limnology (SIL).

Karin Finsterle is a Marine and Freshwater Ecologist based in Italy. She has been working in the field of water quality and environmental management in Europe for more than 20 years and for the past eight years has been a limnological consultant to Phoslock Europe GmbH.

Dr. Patrick Van Goethem is an environmental engineer from Belgium with more than ten years’ experience working with LMB. He has been associated with more than 50 applications of LMB and has a detailed knowledge of all aspects of its use.


Rapid Analytical Solutions for Cyanotoxins

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Most of the harmful algae blooms in lakes throughout the world are due to cyanobacteria which include species that can produce toxins that are broadly called cyanotoxins. There is growing concern about the potential health and environmental effects of toxic blooms as cyanotoxins can cause illness and death of humans plus both domestic and wild animals. Children are at greater risk because of their smaller body size and the way they play in the water. The workshop is intended to provide approaches and examples for response protocols, risk assessment, monitoring programs and management options associated with harmful algae blooms and related cyanotoxins. The morning phase will present both historical background and an overview of rapid test methods and discuss the importance of sample collection, preparation, treatment, storage and transportation. Each participant will have an opportunity to conduct a semi-quantitative microcystins and/or cylindrospermopsin lateral flow, dipstick test. The afternoon phase will focus on participants conducting quantitative, microtiter plate format analysis.

Presenter

Dave Deardorff holds a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Bucknell University and a MBA from the Wharton School. He is a retired Colonel, AUS, and is a licensed professional engineer with over forty years’ experience in environmental engineering. He has conducted over 100 installations and trainings of cyanotoxin systems globally for municipal, state and federal agencies.


The Role of Aeration/Oxygenation in Lake Management

Tuesday, October 30
8:00 am – 5:00 pm | $215

Addition of air or oxygen is frequently used as a lake management option for lakes suffering from oxygen depletion. When used properly, aeration/oxygenation can increase oxygen concentrations in the water column, decrease sediment nutrient release, minimize iron and manganese concentrations, and prevent fish kills. These systems can be designed to provide complete mixing throughout the water column, to increase oxygen concentrations in the hypolimnion without mixing the lake, or to aerate surface waters and provide aesthetic appeal. Improperly designed or installed aeration systems can increase algal growth and lead to decreased water clarity. The workshop will discuss the pros and cons of aeration systems, describe factors that must be considered to properly design aeration/oxygenation systems, and present case studies for both successful and unsuccessful applications.

Presenters

Chris Holdren is a Certified Lake Manager and has served as President, Treasurer, and Board member for NALMS, and also served on the Boards of the Pennsylvania Lake Management Society, the Virginia Lakes and Watersheds Association, and the Colorado Lake and Reservoir Management Association. He has over 40 years of experience with lake and watershed management projects.

Jim Ruane is the President of Reservoir Environmental Management, Inc. and has over 50 years of experience in water quality management for water resources, mathematical modeling, field assessments, and research. He specializes in the development and application of river and reservoir models for hydrodynamics, water quality, aeration, and operational strategies as well as development of water quality management strategies. Assessing oxygen demands and aeration alternatives often is a site-specific process. He has worked on 150 reservoir projects, primarily hydropower projects.

Alex Horne is an Emeritus Professor with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California Berkeley and former NALMS Board member. He has studied lakes, reservoirs, streams, wetlands and oceans in Africa, Antarctica, Europe, the Middle East, Australia, Asia, and North and South America. He has been a Principal Investigator in over 100 funded research projects and served as a consultant for over 600 water-related projects throughout the world. His projects included additions of oxygen or air for fish health and eutrophication reversal, and TOC/DOC and taste and odor reduction in reservoirs.

Kevin Bierlein is an engineer with Hydros Consulting and has spent nearly a decade working with various types of oxygenation and mixing systems. He has designed and led detailed field studies on how these systems impact hydrodynamics, thermal stratification, algae and cyanobacteria, and fluxes across the sediment-water interface. His expertise also includes water-quality modeling, where he has used coupled models to simulate the effects of oxygenation and mixing systems on hydrodynamics, water quality, and interfacial fluxes.