Remote Sensing Methods for Lake Management

Remote sensing holds great promise for lake assessment. Numerous platforms are available for application that can address a variety of questions routinely encountered in the course of lake and watershed studies. Selection of the appropriate platform will be dependent on several factors, including the size and number of lakes to be assessed, degree of resolution and cost of the various applications. NALMS, along with the Universities of Nebraska, University of Wisconsin, University of Minnesota and the U.S. EPA, provide detailed explanations of the various platforms currently in use, preferred applications, limitations, costs and other factors that should help users select the best platform for their data needs. While remote sensing cannot replace all on-the-ground (or on-the-lake, as the case may be) sampling, it can serve to complement existing sampling programs and often allows a broader extrapolation of information.

Order Remote sensing methods for lake management: A guide for resource managers and decision-makers.

This manual is the product of a collaborative effort that included researchers from three universities, assistance from several states and monitoring programs that provided field data, and overall coordination by the North American Lake Management Society. The individual contributions to the manual are listed below. Affiliations and further acknowledgements are noted on the following page. The manual should be cited as follows:

Chipman, J.W., L.G.Olmanson and A.A.Gitelson. 2009. Remote Sensing Methods for Lake Management: A guide for resource managers and decision-makers. Developed by the North American Lake Management Society in collaboration with Dartmouth College, University of Minnesota, and University of Nebraska for the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

Contents

Chapter 1. Overview. Steven A. Heiskary

Chapter 2. Real-Time Proximal Sensing of Water Quality. Anatoly A. Gitelson, Donald C. Rundquist, Giorgio Dall’Olmo, Wesley Moses, and Bryan C. Leavitt

Chapter 3. Airborne Hyperspectral Remote Sensing. Richard L. Perk, Donald C. Rundquist, Giorgio Dall’Olmo, and Anatoly A.Gitelson

Chapter 4. Satellite Remote Sensing I: Landsat and other moderate-resolution systems. Leif G. Olmanson, Marvin E. Bauer, and Patrick L. Brezonik

Chapter 5. Satellite Remote Sensing II: high-resolution systems. Leif G. Olmanson, Marvin E. Bauer, and Patrick L. Brezonik

Chapter 6. Satellite Remote Sensing III: Regional-to global-scale systems. Jonathan W. Chipman

Chapter 7. Future Developments in Remote Sensing for Lake Management. Jonathan W. Chipman and Annette Schloss

Chapter 8. Conclusions. Jonathan W. Chipman, Leif G. Olmanson, Anatoly A. Gitelson, and Steven A. Heiskary